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Though reputation and influence are related, they are not the same thing. Reputation is what people think of you or your brand. Influence is how likely people are to do what you tell them to do. Reputation is measured on a scale of good to bad; influence is measured on the scales of low to high and positive and negative. While everyone wants others to think well of them, popular opinion is not important unless it drives results. Therefore, KD Payne’s claim that “…evaluating your reputation is largely a waste of time” (Payne, 2007) holds true; what people think about you is important, but it is more important to measure how that opinion turns into conversions.

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The FTC plans to decide on whether or not to update their Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising before the end of the summer; learn how this will affect you at Truth in Blogging, my side-project (aka, final presentation for US Digital Media Law).

Social media is the big thing these days: American society has officially reached the point where a single day’s Twitter outage is crippling. Brands and users have come to realize that Twitter, Facebook and the like serve a higher purpose than just connecting with high school crushes and announcing to the world the contents of one’s stomach. In order to successfully engage with shareholders, many companies have strong online presences. Read the rest of this entry »

In today’s digital world, everything is tailored to the individual. Hyperlocal media ensures that people only receive the news that directly affects them. Hypertailored online businesses like Amazon or Netflix support niche desires, so that even if you are the only one in your neighborhood with certain tastes, you can still find everything you want without ever leaving the comfort of your home. The coexistence of hyperlocal blogging and the Long Tail in this regard seems logical, yet also paradoxical. Read the rest of this entry »